Cynthia Nixon holds her first campaign event
The actress is running for governor of New York. Rough cut (no reporter narration)

Broadway stars Miranda and Platt release #MarchforOurLives song
Lin-Manuel Miranda and Ben Platt release a song for the March for Our Lives movement. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Spielberg on "Ready Player One" reviews post SXSW
At the "Ready Player One" European premiere Steven Spielberg talked about the 'amazing' audience response since it debuted at South by Southwest Film Festival in Austin, Texas. ROUGH CUT (No reporter narration).

'Sex and the City' actress Cynthia Nixon to run for New York governor
The actress makes her campaign run official with a tweet. Alicia Powell reports.

Star Wars' appeal is it's 'fairy tale disguised as sci-fi' - Hamill
'The Last Jedi' wins five top awards, including Best Film, Best Director and Best Actress at 23rd annual magazine awards in London. Rough cut (no reporter narration).

Portugal, Ireland woes dominate EU summit
BRUSSELS -- Just on the day EU leaders were hoping to present the final version of their plan to solve the region's debt crisis, their summit in Brussels was overwhelmed Thursday by debate over Portugal's political crisis and Ireland's banking woes.

Moody's downgrades ratings of Spanish banks
MADRID -- Moody's downgraded the debt of 30 Spanish banks Thursday but left untouched the ratings of the country's three largest banks, highlighting the weaknesses in Spain's financial system a day after the government in neighboring Portugal fell.

Markets brush off Portuguese bailout concerns
LONDON -- Markets on Thursday brushed aside mounting speculation that Portugal would soon be tapping a European bailout fund amid hopes that the continent's debt crisis may be about to claim its final scalp - for now.

Japan disaster reminds businesses about insurance
NEW YORK -- It might be inconceivable to small business owners that a disaster hundreds or thousands of miles away could shut them down. But the earthquake and tsunami in Japan have interrupted shipments of parts and finished goods to companies in the U.S., and sent many of them to call their...

Irish economy shrinks for 3rd straight year
DUBLIN -- Ireland's economy shrank in 2010 for the third straight year and the yields on Irish bonds rose to euro-era highs Thursday amid fears that the cost of rescuing the country's failed banks will overwhelm its finances even with the international bailout.

Researchers try to understand naked mole rats' resistance to cancer
With their pinkish, translucent and wrinkly skin, double-saber buck teeth and black-bead eyes, naked mole rats look like characters in a nightmare from hell. In fact, they do live underground in pitch-dark burrows where their air, from a human point of view, can contain chokingly little oxygen, t...

Doctors try new models to push health insurers aside
Just about everyone agrees that the way we pay for primary care needs fixing. Under the current insurance model, doctors get paid for procedures and tests rather than for time spent with patients, which displeases doctors and patients alike and increases costs. Now some medical practices are side...

Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare beneficiaries
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...

Breathless, but not from asthma

Fish and seafood recipe recommendations
Jennifer LaRue Huget offers some suggestions Live Bookmark

North Korea warns of 'abyss of doom' if 'old lunatic' Trump remains president

Exclusive: Undercover teams record grisly remote Faroe Islands whale slaughter

Sotheby's Hong Kong shows and sells Picasso immediately
The auction house says the selling exibition is a testament to Asian buyers' appetite for Western art. Elly Park reports.

Study finds snakes are caring parents
A recent study finds that snakes are caring creatures that protect their nests and remain with their young for a brief period after hatching. The findings go against the snakes' cold-blooded image.

NY art students mold clay into faces of dead, nameless migrants
New York Academy of Art students mold busts from 3D printed skulls of migrants who died trying to cross the border from Mexico into the U.S. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Amazon is fixing Alexa’s unsolicited laughter
Amazon says it knows why its voice-controlled assistant Alexa has been spontaneously laughing at her owners through devices like the Echo, and is working to fix the problem.

Amazon's Jeff Bezos tops 2018 Forbes' billionaires list
The online retail giant's CEO is the richest man in the world, followed by Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates and Berkshire Hathaway's Warren Buffett. Elly Park reports.

This Day in History

US Approves Antiretroviral Drug AZT as a Treatment for AIDS (1987)
Though it was originally developed as an anticancer drug in 1964, azidothymidine (AZT) was never approved for that purpose. Two decades later, however, it was discovered to be effective in fighting HIV. At the time, thousands of people were dying of AIDS, and no other treatment was forthcoming. For humanitarian reasons, the drug was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in a matter of months, rather than the usual eight to 10 years. How does the drug prevent HIV from reproducing? Discuss

Nevada Legalizes Gambling (1931)
Though unregulated gambling had been common in early Nevada mining towns, it was outlawed in 1909, and for many years, the state's economy was carried by mining. However, with the mining industry in decline amid the Great Depression, state lawmakers agreed to re-legalize gambling in order to strengthen the state's finances. Today, the state economy is dominated by tourism and gaming. Nevada has the unusually high ratio of approximately one hotel room to how many state residents?

Landmark US Supreme Court Decision Guarantees Right to Counsel (1963)
After he was accused of breaking into a bar in Florida in 1961, Clarence Gideon was unable to afford a lawyer and was forced to defend himself. Sentenced to five years in prison, he had ample time to study the law, and he began petitioning the courts with the claim that his right to legal counsel had been violated. In 1963, the US Supreme Court agreed with him, establishing that state courts were required to provide attorneys for poor defendants. What happened when Gideon was retried?

Timeless: Taxi Drive to NASCAR
One of my favorite things about family history is uncovering the stories of ordinary people.  People who lived their lives in unassuming ways but still managed to do pretty incredible things.  All too often, though, those stories get lost to time in the face of bigger and brighter personalities.  Family history is a way to Read More

How Do I Find My Irish Cousins among My DNA Matches? (This Works for 331+ Other Regions, Too.)
Isn’t It Time You Were Irish? Has Saint Patrick’s Day left you wondering about your Irish ancestors? Who they were? Where they came from? How they got here? Whether you really have some? Ancestry—and AncestryDNA—can help. You’ll find more than 200 million Irish records on, and AncestryDNA can help you track your Irish roots Read More

ICYMI: New Record Collection Arrivals
Just in case you might have missed them during the harried hustle of the holidays or the long winter’s night, we asked three of our favorite family historians to dish on some of their favorite new records on Ancestry. Ten years between U.S. federal censuses is just long enough for families to move, people to Read More

Timeless, Marie Curie, and WWI
Here at Ancestry, the Research and Editorial Team (of which I am a part) loves the TV show, Timeless.  It makes sense.  The show centers around a group of time travelers.  And, what family historian do you know that doesnt wish they could travel back in time to the places their ancestors lived? (If you Read More

Inspiring At-Risk Youth Through Heritage and Art
What if knowing your history could give you a greater sense of confidence and inspire your direction in life? “The project was made to be liberating, eye-opening, and informative&an effort to spark interest in individuals to discover their heritage and to learn more about the history of their origins.”
— Thomas Evans Following the success of Read More - RSS Channel - App Tech Section

"Letting anyone publish anything for free and get rewarded based on the attention that they can drive was -- is a bad concept in itself," says Ev Williams.

Wonders of the universe

Mihir Garimella is making drones that go where humans can't
Drones can enter dangerous environments where humans cannot. But what if a drone could stop disasters from happening in the first place?

It seems like every week we're finding new uses for drones. Here's some of the most interesting out there today. - RSS Channel - App Travel Section

Winter in Japan's hidden mountain village
In Ginzan Onsen, historic buildings overlook the pristine and calming Ginzan River, which flows through the center of the village.

This is the world's happiest country
Reindeer jerky, anyone? Finland is the happiest country in the world, according to the latest World Happiness Report.

How to fly with your dog -- safely
Flying with your dog? Here are tips on how to prepare your pooch or other pets for a safe and comfortable airplane ride.

Secrets of the Tower of London
Chris Skaife, Ravenmaster at the Tower of London, tells CNN Travel about his unconventional job.

Mexico's best barefoot beach
Isla Holbox is a small, slender island just north of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico. Mexicans have long been in the know about this laid-back, go-everywhere-in-flip-flops getaway, but the news of Holbox's beauty and ease of living has started to get out.